Home Off Beat Guide to Planting Trees and Bushes in Maryland and Virginia

Guide to Planting Trees and Bushes in Maryland and Virginia

by Dr Prem Community Writer

As a homeowner in Maryland or Virginia, it’s crucial that you know how to plant trees and bushes appropriately. Planting trees and bushes is something that you might want to do to increase the salability of the home or just to make your home look even more beautiful. Regardless of why you’re choosing to do it, planting trees and bushes in Maryland and Virginia doesn’t have to be difficult, and here’s how you can do it best.

Planting Guide

Planting Guide Where NOT to Plant Trees and Bushes in Your Yard Created By:  JES

Step One: Choosing the Right Plants

First and foremost, you need to make sure you’re choosing the right plants for the job. Not everyone is going to want the same look, but there are some elements to pay attention to as you’re choosing trees and bushes.

Trees

If you go to a local nursery, you’ll find all sorts of trees ready for planting. What are the best trees for you to plant in Virginia and Maryland?

  • Crabapple (15-35 Feet Tall, 10-25 Feet Wide)
  • American Dogwood (20 Feet Tall, 15-20 Feet Wide)
  • White Fringetree (12-20 Feet Tall, 12-20 Feet Wide)
  • Hawthorn (25-30 Feet Tall, 20-25 Feet Wide)
  • American Holly (15-30 Feet Tall, 18-25 Feet Wide)
  • Pawpaw (15-20 Feet Tall, 15-20 Feet Wide)

As you can see, these trees can vary substantially in width. You’ll typically want to plant trees to make sure their maximum widths don’t overlap. If you have to, you might be able to plant them slightly closer together, but it’s always a good idea to plant a safe distance away from your home at least.

Bushes

If you don’t want to take the time and energy to plant and maintain trees in your yard, why not consider some bushes? Bushes can be a great way to add a pop of style to your home, especially if you choose one of these.

  • William Penn Barberry (3-5 Feet Apart)
  • Buttonbush (2-3 Feet Apart)
  • Sweet Pepperbush (4-6 Feet Apart)
  • Tatarian Dogwood (8-10 Feet Apart)
  • Border Forsythia (4-6 Feet Apart)
  • Dwarf Fothergilla (3 Feet Apart)
  • Smooth Hydrangea (3-10 Feet Apart)
  • Chinese Holly (5-25 Feet Apart)

These bushes are especially great if you want a lot of greenery and don’t want to plant them very far apart. In contrast to trees, which typically have to be at least 10 feet apart, you can plant many bushes as close together as only about two feet apart from each other.

Step Two: Planting at the Right Time

Next, make sure you’re planting at the right time. After all, you don’t want to plant a spring tree in the fall; it’ll die once it reaches the winter. Do some research on the type of tree or bush you’re most interested in to make sure it will plant well at the time you’re hoping to plant your trees and bushes.

Because these are all local trees, they should be fine to plant in the climate of Maryland and Virginia as long as you’re able to plant them at the right time. However, it’s always a good idea to get them from a nursery if at all possible so that they’ll be hardier.

Step Three: Making Sure Your Plants Don’t Cause Problems

There are many ways plants can cause problems after you plant them. When you choose plants that are local to a specific location, you’re unlikely to cause problems with the local wildlife. However, you may have these problems if you don’t account for local plant options.

Trees can also cause problems if you plant them inappropriately close to your home. This can cause foundation problems, as the tree’s roots can literally grow underneath your home and push up on the concrete. Make sure you plant them away from the home for best results.

Conclusion

There are many different elements to planting trees and bushes in any location. Whether you’re planting in Maryland and Virginia or not, you need to think about your options for trees and bushes carefully. It’s a great way to make your home look even more beautiful in a simple way that also makes your home more valuable.

Article Submitted By Community Writer